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Interview:
Amos Lee at The Fillmore, 3 Things To Know
 

By Gary Graff
ggraff@digitalfirstmedia.com, @GraffonMusic on Twi

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Nobody would call Amos Lee a household name. But the Philadelphia singer-songwriter has done quite well for himself during the past dozen years of releasing albums.

Lee’s sixth and latest title, 2016’s “Spirit,” was his third consecutive Top 10 on the Billboard Rock Albums charts, weighing in at No. 3. He also had a No. 1 on the Billboard 200 overall chart with 2011’s “Mission Bell.” He’s a go-to for movie music coordinators and has opened for a who’s-who of artists, including Bob Dylan, Paul Simon, Merle Haggard, Van Morrison, Adele and more.

Lee, 40, has been promoting “Spirit” with his largest-ever headlining tour, though he admits he’s getting an itch to start working on something new again...

• “Spirit” was the first time Lee had ever produced one of his own albums alone, and while he was somewhat overwhelmed by the details he says he learned a lot from the process. “Something I got out of it is if I can capture the essence of what I’m doing live on the song in the studio it always seems to translate better,” Lee explains by phone from Philadelphia. “Sometimes in a recording session you can get overwhelmed and bogged down with the details for a concept rather than focusing on the pure bones of the songs. The songs that have the strongest bones on the latest record are the ones I continue to play in my live shows.”

• “Spirit” was also Lee’s first under a deal with John Vibratos/Republic Records, and he’s enjoying the association with the Detroit-born menswear designer. “It’s very cool, man,” Lee says. “His clothes are awesome. They’re stylish and they’re unique; He’s shown me what the cut on my pants should look like and he likes his collars a certain way. But they’re comfortable. For me that’s helpful because when I’m performing I don’t want to feel uncomfortable.” As for the music, Lee says Varvatos “weighs in but he wasn’t sitting there telling me about the bridge or guitar tones. But he’d be talking to me beat stuff and ideas, which was cool.”

• As he ends the promotional cycle for “Spirit,” Lee is gearing up to make another album -- soon. “I’m going to try to record in November, actually,” he says, adding that songs “are around. They’re all kind of floating. I’m feeling pretty connected to seven or eight tunes right now. I’m not going to be too laborious with overthinking a million parts or a million songs; I want to be able to go in, find the most important part, which is the performance, and go from there. I kind of want to take a sept back to basics, and there’s definitely a more personal, intimate message that I would like to send with this next recording that I don’ think I sent enough on the last one, so you feel like you’re in the room with me. It’s hard to explain, but that’s the best way I can put it.”



If You Go:

• Amos Lee

• Saturday, Oct. 21. Doors open at 7 p.m.

• The Fillmore Detroit, 2115 Woodward Ave.

• Tickets are $20-$65.

• Call 313-961-5451 or visit thefillmoredetroit.com.

Web Site: www,thefillmoredetroit.com

Send your thoughts and comments to Gary Graff

 



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